Freight Forwarder Dublin Ireland, Shipping Agent Dublin Ireland
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Freight Forwarder Dublin Ireland, Shipping Agent Dublin Ireland
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Shipping Glossary

      
Bill of Lading - B/LCASSChargeable WeightCIFCIPCPT
DDPDDUDemurrageEx WorksFCAFOB
House WaybillSDRULDWeight or Measure                
      
Bill of Lading - B/LA bill of lading (also referred to as a BOL or B/L) is a document issued by a carrier, e.g. a ship's master or by a company's shipping department, acknowledging that specified goods have been received on board as cargo for conveyance to a named place for delivery to the consignee who is usually identified. A through bill of lading involves the use of at least two different modes of transport from road, rail, air, and sea. The term derives from the noun "bill", a schedule of costs for services supplied or to be supplied, and from the verb "to lade" which means to load a cargo onto a ship or other form of transport.
CASSCargo Account Settlement Systems (CASS) are designed to simplify the billing and settling of accounts between airlines and freight forwarders. They operate through CASSlink, an advanced global web-enabled e-billing solution.
Chargeable WeightIn airfreight, the chargeable weight is the actual gross weight or volume weight, whichever is higher, apart from certain exceptions.
CIFThis is a global shipping terms which use in international trade. CIF means Cost Insurance and Freight. That means shipper/Trader has to pay the Cost of shipment up to the ship, Insurance cost of cargo and Freight cost up to destination port.
CIPCarriage & Insurance Paid To (named port of destination) The seller has the same obligations as under CPT, but must also procure cargo insurance against the buyer’s risk of loss of, or damage to the goods during the carriage. The seller contracts for insurance and pays the insurance premium, although he is required to obtain only minimum coverage. The seller must clear the goods for export.
CPTCarriage Paid To (named port of destination) The seller pays the freight for carriage of the goods to the named destination. The risk of loss of, or damage to the goods, as well as any additional costs due to the events occurring after the time the goods have been delivered into the custody of the carrier. In this context, "carrier" means any person who, in a contract of carriage, undertakes to perform or to procure the performance of carriage by rail, road, sea, air, inland waterway, or by a combination of such modes. If subsequent carriers are used for the carriage to the agreed destination, the risk passes when the goods have been delivered to the first carrier. The CPT team requires the seller to clear the goods for export. The term applies to any mode of transport, including multi-modal transport.
DDPDelivered Duty Paid (named place of destination) The seller fulfills his obligation to deliver when the goods are available at the named place in the country of importation. (named place of destination) The seller fulfills his obligation to deliver when the goods are available at the named place in the country of importation. (named place of destination) The seller fulfills his obligation to deliver when the goods are available at the named place in the country of importation.
DDUDelivered Duty Unpaid (named place of destination) The seller fulfills his obligation to deliver when the goods are available at the named place in the country of importation.
DemurrageIn commercial shipping, demurrage is an ancillary cost that represents liquidated damages for delays, occurs when the vessel is prevented from the loading or discharging of cargo within the stipulated laytime.
Ex WorksEx works (EXW) is an Incoterm. It means that the seller X has the goods ready for collection at his premises (Works, factory, warehouse, plant) on the date agreed upon. The buyer pays all transportation costs and also bears the risks for bringing the goods to their final destination. This term requires that the buyer must be able to carry out export formalities in the country of supply.
FCAThe seller delivers the goods into the custody of the first carrier, and this is where risk passes from seller to buyer. The buyer pays for the transportation. It can be used for all modes of transportation including multimodal transport, such as in shipping containers where the ship's rail plays no relevant part in determining a shipping point.
FOBFree on Board (named port of shipment). Means the seller completes his obligation to deliver when the goods pass over the ship’s rail at the named port of shipment.
House WaybillIssued by a freight forwarder (consolidator) to a shipper as a receipt for the goods which will be shipped with other cargo as one consignment to avail of better freight rates. The airline's (carrier's) AWB shows the forwarder as the consignor, and the name of forwarder's agent at the destination as the consignee. Although it is not a complete document of title, a forwarder's AWB has a legal-standing similar to that of a carrier's AWB. Also called house air waybill.
SDRSpecial Drawing Rights - is an international reserve asset, created by the IMF in 1969 to supplement the existing official reserves of member countries. SDRs are allocated to member countries in proportion to their IMF quotas. The SDR also serves as the unit of account of the IMF and some other international organizations. Its value is based on a basket of key international currencies.
ULDUnit Load Devices, or ULDs, are pallets and containers used to load luggage, freight, and mail on wide-body aircraft and specific narrow-body aircraft. They allow large quantities of cargo to be bundled into large units. Since this leads to fewer units to load, it saves ground crews time and effort, and helps prevent delayed flights. Each ULD is manifested separately so that its contents can be tracked.
Weight or MeasureAll transport modes "convert" space utilised by a consignment by different factors. Deadweight cargo by sea is cargo weighing 1 tonne and measuring 1 cubic metre (volume) or less. Road transport converts usually at 3 cubic metres per tonne and airfreight allows 6 cubic metres of space per tonne. Freight charges in each case are then calculated on the basis of whatever will bring the carriers the greatest return.
      
        
Air Ocean Ireland Limited: Unit 10 D Santry Business Pk, Santry , Dublin 9, Ireland        Phone: +353 1 8428404        Email: garrett@airocean.ie        Powered by: go2web